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The Law of NinesThe Law of Nines by Terry Goodkind

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

If you’ve read Terry Goodkind’s Sword of Truth Series, you will be familiar with the premise of this book. At the end of Confessor, Richard Rahl opens a gateway to another world where those without the spark of magic and those who wish to live in a world without magic can live without the continued corruption of Richard’s world. Richard’s sister decided to join this new world, thus continuing the Rahl line in the new world.

In The Law of Nines, we are introduced to Alexander Rahl, an artist. The book’s setting is present day Earth, with all the technological advantages we have, without any magic, or so we think. We are thrown into the story when a young, beautiful woman (Jax) “pops” into Alex’s life and turns his world, and what he knows of the world, upside down. With Alex’s mother locked away in a mental institution, Alex quickly begins to doubt his own sanity. As events unfold and “magic” happens before his eyes, Alex’s sanity is no longer questioned and he begins the quest to fulfill the prophecy from another world.

Just as The Fellowship of the Order in The Sword of Truth series wanted to eradicate all magic, it seems that history is doomed to repeat itself. A new “order” has formed and is threatening magic once more. It is said that the one named in The Law of Nines prophesy shall save their world, but that man is not of their world. Jax must go and find him. Over the course of a millennia, those who with magic have managed to bridge the void and enter the world without magic.

The Law of Nines is a classic conflict of good versus evil, where The Sword of Truth left off, The Law of Nines brings to light the continual history repeats itself issue. Life is a dichotomy and when there is a happy ending, there will always be a sad beginning. History always seems to repeat.

And, as with any of Terry Goodkind’s books, it is such a slow build up to the action. All of his books I have read seem to start anything really good about midway through the book. This is no different. Another issue I have with this is the name of the heroine of this book (Jax). In the Sword of Truth series, Terry Goodkind embedded the love story of Richard Rahl and Kahlen Amnell. In The Law of Nines, the lineage is kind of odd. I understand that Alexander Rahl is descended from Richard’s sister, Jennsen Rahl. But, Jax is supposed to be descended from Kahlen as Jax holds the name Amnell. Unless Kahlen kept the name of Amnell, and thus her children inherited that name…I cannot see how Jax would be descended from Kahlen, more like her father’s house…Prince Harold, her half-brother, and thus her Confessor line would be void. But, in The Law of Nines, it is alluded to that Jax is a Confessor, based on the length of her hair and the fact she doesn’t let anyone cut it.

I love the continuation of the storyline. So, I must overlook the problem. Just as I had to overlook the serious plot issue with Nathal Rahl in The Sword of Truth Series. Maybe this point will be explained deeper in Goodkind’s new book, The Omen Machine, where he will continue the Richard and Kahlen story. One can only hope.

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